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    Author(s): David Trotter
    Date: 2002
    Source: In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 201-205
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (440 B)

    Description

    Insects, weeds, and diseases are a significant part of the production process that nursery growers must consider in order to effectively grow the desired conifer seedling. For the pests and seedlings, the underlying theme is survival, which encompasses 3 major components: stimulus, recognition, and response (Shigo 1991). Thus, the continuation of any system depends on its ability to recognize a stimulus that, in the case of the seedling, threatens or, in the case of the insect, enhances its survival. Once recognized, there must be the ability to respond rapidly and effectively. The speed and effectiveness of the response depends greatly on the availability of energy. In the seedling, reserve energy is used to mount a quick and effective block to any agent that threatens its existence. For the insect or disease, how fast the stimulus is recognized and the degree to which a response is developed are key elements to its survival. Every system has strong and weak periods; therefore, any pest management plan must target the most vulnerable phenological stage of the seedling or pest. Reforestation nurseries represent a unique challenge to the pest managers, as they are subject to pest problems originating from agriculture and forest pest complexes. In addition, conifer seedlings destined for reforestation sites are grown to strict specifications, therefore significantly reducing the nursery's level of tolerance to pest damage. Nursery managers are eager to reduce pesticide use to satisfy concerns expressed by nursery workers, tree planters, and regulatory agencies. The following is a summary of insect pest management strategies currently under development and implementation in British Columbia (BC) nurseries.

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    Citation

    Trotter, David 2002. Approach and rationale to developing an IPM program: Examples of insect management in British Columbia reforestation nurseries. In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 201-205

    Keywords

    cutworms, aphids, lygus bug, root weevils, fungus gnats, container pest management

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