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    Author(s): Rene Alberto Lopez Castilla; Angela Duarte Casanova; Celia Guerra Rivero; Haylett Cruz Escoto; Natividad Triguero Issasi
    Date: 2002
    Source: In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 213-218
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (545 B)

    Description

    A systematic survey of methods to detect pests in forest nurseries before they damage plants was done. These surveys recorded the most important forest nursery pests during 18 years (from 1980 to 1998) and their geographical and temporal distribution in the principal enterprises in Cuba. Approximately a dozen insect species and three fungi species responsible for the major problems in forest nurseries in Cuba were studied. The principal insect pests are: Anomis illita (Guer) pep. Noctuidae), a defoliator of Hibiscus elatus (blue mahoe); Anurogrillus spp. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) a defoliator of Tabebuia angustata (white wood), Samanea saman (raintree), Cordia gerascanthus (cordia wood), Cedrela odorata (cigar box cedar); Atta insularis (Guer) (Hym. Forrnicidae) a defoliator of Hibiscus elatus (blue mahoe), Pinus caribaea (Caribbean pine), Swietenia macrophylla (Honduras mahogany), Casuarina equisetfolia (horsetail beehood); Draeculocephala cubana (Hom. Cicadellidae) a defoliator of Eucalyptus sp. (Eucalyptus), Hibiscus elatur (blue mahoe), Tectona grandis (teakwood) and Samanea saman (raintree). The principal fungi are Fusarium sp. (damping off) for broadleaf spp., and Lecanosticta acicola (Mycosphaerella dearnessii) and Sphaeropsis sapinea (Diploid blight) in forest pine nurseries. The integrated management of forest pests in nurseries in Cuba is discussed. Biological control is utilized but, with few exceptions, the current management of pests relies on chemical products. Finally, the status of pest management in forest nurseries and prospects for the future are discussed.

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    Citation

    Castilla, Rene Alberto Lopez; Casanova, Angela Duarte; Rivero, Celia Guerra; Escoto, Haylett Cruz; Issasi, Natividad Triguero 2002. Forest nursery pest management in Cuba. In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 213-218

    Keywords

    seedling, reforestation, disease, insects, fungi, cultural control, IPM

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