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    Author(s): James D. Haywood
    Date: 2002
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp 103-108
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (56 KB)

    Description

    To examine the effects of delaying prescribed burning for several years, I initiated five treatments in a 5- to 6-year-old longleaf pine stand: a check of no control; biennial hardwood control by directed chemical application; and biennial burning in either early March, May, or July. After the initial burns, longleaf pine survival decreased from 82 percent in February 1999 to 67 percent in November 2000. Mortality was highest among the smallest pine trees. Total pine heights in November 2000, adjusted for initial heights in February 1999, averaged 11.9, 11.5, 10.9, 11.4, and 11.3 ft on the five treatments, respectively. Total height was significantly greater on the check treatment than the average of the other four treatments, and March burning had the most adverse effect on height growth.

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    Citation

    Haywood, James D. 2002. Delayed prescribed burning in a seedling and sapling Longleaf Pine plantation in Louisiana. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp 103-108

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