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    Author(s): John S. Kominoski; Catherine M. Pringle; Becky A. Ball
    Date: 2008
    Source: Verhandlungen der Internationalen Vereinigung fur Theoretische und Angewandte Limnologie 2008, vol. 30, Part 1, p. 109-112
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (615 KB)

    Description

    Ecosystems are experiencing rapid ecological changes due to human-driven alterations in climate, land-use, nutrient availability, and introduction of pests and pathogens. Many of these environmental changes are predicted to result in non-random loss of species that will alter community composition (VITOUSEK et a1. 1997, LOREAU et a1. 2001, ELLISON et a1. 200S). For example, in eastern U. S. forests, current declines in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) resulting from infestation of the woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) are altering riparian tree community composition (ORWIG et a1. 2002). Declines in eastern hemlock in southern Appalachian forests are projected to result in long-term increases in tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) or rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum; ELLISON et a1. 200S), but short-term seasonal effects of woolly adelgid infestation on allochthonous inputs to streams have not been studied.

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    Citation

    Kominoski, John S.; Pringle, Catherine M.; Ball, Becky A. 2008. Invasive woolly adelgid appears to drive seasonal hemlock and carcass inputs to a detritus-based stream. Verhandlungen der Internationalen Vereinigung fur Theoretische und Angewandte Limnologie 2008, vol. 30, Part 1, p. 109-112

    Keywords

    eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), eastern U. S. forests, invasive species, life cycle, litterfall, streams, woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae)

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