Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Craig Watson; Chuck Hayes; Joseph McCauley; Andrew Milliken
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 266-276
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (785 KB)

    Description

    In 1999, the Management Board of the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture (ACJV) embraced the vision and framework of the then newly emerging North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI). Traditionally a Joint Venture focused on the conservation of waterfowl and wetlands habitat, the ACJV expanded its role throughout the Atlantic Flyway to all resident and migratory birds. As a first step, the ACJV launched the South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative (SAMBI) in the Southeastern Coastal Plain Bird Conservation Region. Biologists, land managers, and planners, representing non-governmental organizations, state and federal agencies, and private interests from five states (Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia) assembled to begin the process of developing a regionally based biological plan, integrating the objectives of four major bird conservation initiatives: the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, United States Shorebird Conservation Plan, North American Waterbird Conservation Plan, and Partners in Flight. The primary objectives were to develop population and habitat goals for priority species, delineate "all bird" focus areas, develop a long-term framework for bird conservation in the Southeastern Coastal Plain, and develop and seek funding for "all bird" projects. This effort has been tremendously successful, receiving nearly $18 million dollars for sixty projects within the ACJV for "all bird" conservation over the period from March 2000 to June 2003. Many of these projects focused on the conservation of waterfowl and wetland-dependent species, as well as landbirds, a very non-traditional approach by a waterfowl Joint Venture. These projects benefited a wide variety of other bird species, affected a variety of land ownerships, and stimulated additional conservation partnerships throughout the South Atlantic Region. Because of the success of SAMBI, it serves as a model for "all bird" conservation.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Watson, Craig; Hayes, Chuck; McCauley, Joseph; Milliken, Andrew. 2005. The South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative – An Integrated Approach to Conservation of "All Birds Across All Habitats". In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 266-276

    Keywords

    conservation implementation, north Pacific coast, Oregon, priority activities, shorebirds, Washington

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page