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    Author(s): Diana Stralberg; Nils Warnock; Nadav Nur; Hildie Spautz; Gary W. Page
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 121-129
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (734 KB)

    Description

    More than 80 percent of San Francisco Bay's original tidal wetlands have been altered or displaced, reducing available habitat for a range of tidal marsh-dependent species, including the Federally listed California Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) and three endemic Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) subspecies. In the South Bay, many tidal marshes were converted to commercial salt ponds, which have since become among the most important Pacific coast sites for shorebirds, waterfowl and other waterbirds. Recently, however, over 6,000 ha of commercial salt ponds were sold to wildlife management agencies for creation and restoration of tidal marsh systems, which will result in a significant change in the Bay's wetland landscape. This situation creates a need to evaluate the interrelated and potentially conflicting habitat needs of a wide range of species, in order to inform priorities for wetland restoration and management. Using a combination of standardized bird survey protocols, GIS habitat mapping, statistical modeling and simulation, PRBO is developing the first iteration of a "habitat conversion model." The goal of this project is to identify the key relationships between habitat features and bird distributions, develop models to predict bird community changes that accompany habitat conversion and disseminate results to other scientists and land managers.

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    Citation

    Stralberg, Diana; Warnock, Nils; Nur, Nadav; Spautz, Hildie; Page, Gary W. 2005. Building a Habitat Conversion Model for San Francisco Bay Wetlands: A Multi-species Approach for Integrating GIS and Field Data. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 121-129

    Keywords

    habitat restoration, salt ponds, San Francisco Bay, tidal marsh, waterbirds

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