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    Author(s): Kenneth V. Rosenberg; Jeffrey V. Wells
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 236-253
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.0 MB)

    Description

    As part of the Partners in Flight (PIF) bird-conservation planning process, we assessed breeding land bird species according to seven categories of population vulnerability to derive a priority species pool in each of 12 physiographic areas that overlap the northeastern U.S. We then grouped species into the following habitat-species suites: (1) boreal-mountaintop habitats (stunted conifers) that support a majority of the world's population of Bicknell's Thrush; (2) maritime marsh and ecotonal communities that support nearly all breeding Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows, coastal populations of Nelson's Sharp-tailed Sparrows, Black Rail, Seaside Sparrow, and American Black Duck; (3) naturally disturbed and early-successional shrub-scrub habitats that support Appalachian Bewick's Wren (possibly extinct), Golden-winged Warbler, and American Woodcock; (4) natural and agricultural grasslands that support Henslow's Sparrow, Upland Sandpiper, eastern Grasshopper Sparrow, and Bobolink; (5) oak-dominated hardwood forests that support Cerulean Warblers, Worm-eating Warblers, and associated species; and (6) northern-hardwood and mixed coniferous forests that support Canada Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler and associated species. The value of these and other habitats (e.g. coastal concentration sites) to stopover migrants is also undoubtedly very high, although this remains largely unquantified. Within each habitat-species suite, we have identified population status, threats to habitats, and research needs, and recommended strategies for conservation action. Results of this PIF planning process will be integrated with objectives for waterbirds, shorebirds, and colonial waterbirds, as part of the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI) efforts.

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    Citation

    Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; Wells, Jeffrey V. 2005. Conservation Priorities for Terrestrial Birds in the Northeastern United States. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 236-253

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