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    Author(s): Joseph B. Buchanan
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 419-428
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (352 KB)

    Description

    Conservation of species associated with mature forest habitats remains an important objective for non-federal lands in the Pacific Northwest. With few exceptions, state forest practices rules, a Washington state pilot landscape planning program, and federal Habitat Conservation Plans provide little functional habitat for species, like the Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus), that are associated with mature forest structures such as large-diameter snags and defective trees. At the beginning of the new millennium, millions of hectares of non-federal forest lands in western Washington and Oregon will be managed on 50-year rotations with no emphasis on using "new forestry" or adaptive management principles to benefit avian conservation. The economic philosophy of managing forests on relatively short rotations, is a major impediment to Partners in Flight conservation planning in the Pacific Northwest, and likely elsewhere. Solutions to this forest bird conservation dilemma may involve regulation, economic incentive programs (potentially including concepts like carbon sequestration and green certification), corporate and stockholder outreach and education regarding conservation needs, and alternatives to modernday forest management practices (including ecologically based forest management trusts). PIF should convene a national committee to work with non-federal land managers and stakeholders to identify the impediments to successful conservation, and develop and implement a strategic plan designed to bring about meaningful bird conservation on non-federal forests.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Buchanan, Joseph B. 2005. Challenges of Avian Conservation on Non-Federal Forests in the Pacific Northwest. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 419-428

    Keywords

    conservation, Dryocopus pileatus, forest management, implementation impediment, Pacific Northwest, Pileated Woodpecker

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/31711