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    Author(s): Rebecca Latham; Rick Wooten; Anne Witt; Ken Gillon; Tommy Douglas; Stephen Fuemmeler; Jennifer Bauer; Scott Brame
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: 2007 Southeastern Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip Guidebook: 1-36
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (8.34 MB)

    Description

    On September 16,2004 the remnants of Hurricane Ivan dumped heavy rain on Macon County, North Carolina, triggering a debris slide near the top of Fishhawk Mountain (figure 1) at an elevation of 4,420 ft around 10: 10 PM. This slide quickly mobilized into a debris flow that traveled approximately 2.25 miles and dropped 2,000 ft colliding with the Peeks Creek community and ultimately the Cullasaja River. Along its path, calculated estimates yield a maximum velocity of 33.2 miles per hour (mph) and a conservative discharge estimate of 45,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). The resulting debris flow destroyed fifteen homes in the downstream community adjacent to Peeks Creek and killed five people.

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    Citation

    Latham, Rebecca; Wooten, Rick; Witt, Anne; Gillon, Ken; Douglas, Tommy; Fuemmeler, Stephen; Bauer, Jennifer; Brame, Scott 2007. Investigation of the peeks creek debris flow of September 2004 and its relationship to landslide hazard mapping in Macon County, North Carolina. In: 2007 Southeastern Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip Guidebook: 1-36

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