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    Author(s): Dean Nernberg; David Ingstrup
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 478-484
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (322 KB)

    Description

    In Canada, grassland conservation has been mobilized and directed through the development of Prairie Conservation Action Plans and Action Plan Committees in the three prairie provinces of Alberta (45 partner agencies and organizations), Saskatchewan (26 partners), and Manitoba (26 partners). In Alberta, 43 percent of the native prairie remains; in Saskatchewan and Manitoba the amount of mixed-grass prairie remaining is less than 20 percent, while tall-grass prairie in Manitoba has been reduced to less than one percent. Although there are many similarities in the approaches taken to conserve remnant prairie in each province, there are many contrasts due to differences in jurisdictional, political, cultural, climatological, industrial, and agricultural backgrounds. Moreover, the differences in size and total area of remaining prairie, by province, has stimulated differences in programs, projects, and methods for conserving this natural resource. In Alberta, the vision is ‘To Conserve the Biological Diversity of Native Prairie and Parkland Ecosystems for the Benefit of Current and Future Generations’, focusing strongly on biodiversity and landscapes. In Saskatchewan, the vision is ‘The Native Prairie is To Be Sustained in a Healthy State in Which Natural and Human Values are Respected’, with a strong focus on supporting sustainable livestock production and working landscapes. While in Manitoba, the main focus is ‘Identifying and Implementing Economic Activities That Go Hand in Hand with the Restoration and Maintenance of Healthy Prairie Ecosystems’, with attention on deriving economic benefit from the land in a sustainable fashion. The success of the Prairie Conservation Action Plan Committee process in Canada is due largely to the ability of all prairie stakeholders to sit around the same table and discuss difficult prairie conservation issues in an amiable and respectful fashion

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    Citation

    Nernberg, Dean; Ingstrup, David. 2005. Prairie Conservation in Canada: The Prairie Conservation Action Plan Experience. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 478-484

    Keywords

    Alberta Prairie Conservation Forum, grassland conservation, Canada, Manitoba Prairie Conservation Action Plan, birds, native grassland, native prairie, PCAP, prairie conservation, Prairie Conservation Action Plan, Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/31852