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    Author(s): David L. Swanson; Kurt L. Dean; Heather A. Carlisle; Eric T. Liknes
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 541-549
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (470 KB)

    Description

    Woodland habitat types in the northern Great Plains compose only a very small fraction of the total land surface. These woodlands occur primarily as natural riparian forests or as scattered anthropogenic woodlots and shelterbelts. Natural riparian woodlands have been markedly reduced over the past century, but anthropogenic woodlands have increased during this same period. In this paper, we review and synthesize mist net and point count data from riparian corridor woodlands (Missouri and Big Sioux rivers) and farmstead woodlots in southeastern South Dakota to compare neotropical migrant abundance, species richness, diversity, and community similarity in these two habitats during spring and fall migrations. We hypothesized that the larger and more contiguous woodland area and greater vegetative diversity of riparian corridor woodlands relative to woodlots would attract higher numbers and more species of neotropical migrants. Point count abundances were higher in woodlots than in riparian corridors in both spring and fall, whereas capture rates were similar in spring, but higher in Missouri River woodlands than at other sites in fall. Species richness and diversity were similar in riparian corridors and woodlots at both seasons. Community overlap between riparian corridors and woodlots was high in spring, but was lower in fall. In general, these data suggest that overall abundance and diversity of neotropical migrant communities are similar between riparian corridors and farmstead woodlots, despite some differences for individual species. In addition, recaptured migrants were capable of gaining mass during stopover in woodlots. Farmstead woodlots appear to effectively supplement natural riparian corridor woodlands as stopover sites for neotropical migrants. Thus, conservation of even small woodland parcels may benefit neotropical woodland migrants during migration.

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    Citation

    Swanson, David L.; Dean, Kurt L.; Carlisle, Heather A.; Liknes, Eric T. 2005. Riparian and Woodlot Landscape Patterns and Migration of Neotropical Migrants in Riparian Forests of Eastern South Dakota. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 1 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 541-549

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/31893