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    Author(s): E. Durant McArthur; Richard Stevens
    Date: 2004
    Source: In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 493-538
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (835 B)

    Description

    The sunflower family (Compositae or Asteraceae) is the largest family of flowering plants. Its many species occur around the world as annual and perennial herbs and as shrubs and trees (Benson 1957; Cronquist 1968; Wagenitz 1977). Three shrubby genera of the family-sagebrush (Artemisia), rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus), and matchbrush (Gutierrezia)-make plants of this family among the most common and important plants of the Intermountain area (McArthur and others 1979a; table 1). Shrubs of these genera provide critically needed ground cover on arid Western ranges, are important sources of browse for domestic livestock and big game, and serve as cover and forage for many wildlife species. A number of sagebrush and rabbitbrush species are important as cover for small birds, game birds, and mammals, and as browse plants for big game animals, especially on winter and early spring ranges. Some species also provide forage for livestock (sheep and cattle). Horsebrush and matchbrush also contribute more forage than is generally believed; however, both plants may, under certain conditions, be harmful to domestic livestock (Benson and Darrow 1945; Johnson 1974a; McArthur and others 1979a) and cause allergies in humans (Lewis and Elvin-Lewis 1977; Rodriguez and others 1976).

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    Citation

    McArthur, E. Durant; Stevens, Richard. 2004. Chapter 21. Composite shrubs. In: Monsen, Stephen B.; Stevens, Richard; Shaw, Nancy L., comps. Restoring western ranges and wildlands, vol. 2. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-136-vol-2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 493-538

    Keywords

    rehabilitation, revegetation, plant ecology, seed, plant communities, wildlife habitat, invasive species, equipment, plant materials, native plants

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