Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Jonathan Bart; Ralph C. John
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 982-984
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (95.0 KB)

    Description

    Bird monitoring is at a crossroads. While monitoring programs have existed in North America for nearly a century, recent political, biological, sociological, and economic changes necessitate a new and more efficient approach. Fortunately we now have tools available to meet the demands, including powerful coalitions of the willing within agencies, organizations, and universities. Further, rapid advances in several areas auger well for the process: specifically advances in monitoring methods, data archiving, and extremely powerful computer tools that allow retrieval and analysis, all have reached unprecedented levels of sophistication. The waterbird, shorebird, and landbird initiatives have all begun work on taxa-specific monitoring programs (e.g., Brown et al. 2001, Donaldson et al. 2001, Kushlan et al. 2002, Rich et al. 2004). Their plans identify species that warrant monitoring, important habitat relationships, declare goals for long-term estimates of trend in population size, and – to varying degrees – describe how the goals can best be achieved. Coordinated Bird Monitoring (CBM) is an attempt by the initiatives, working with many agencies, nongovernment organizations, and individuals, to forge a comprehensive approach to monitoring that will provide information on all nongame birds. Here, we briefly describe the CBM approach, how it can help implement the initiatives' proposals, and suggest which aspects of the general approach should be emphasized during the next several years.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Bart, Jonathan; John, Ralph C. 2005. The need for a North American coordinated bird monitoring program. In: Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D., editors 2005. Bird Conservation Implementation and Integration in the Americas: Proceedings of the Third International Partners in Flight Conference. 2002 March 20-24; Asilomar, California, Volume 2 Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-191. Albany, CA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 982-984

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page