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    Author(s): Kristina Connor
    Date: 2009
    Source: In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E., tech. coords. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2008. Proc. RMRS-P-58. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 108-113
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (395 B)

    Description

    Moisture levels in acorns before storage are critical. Two years after being dried before storage, water oak (Quercus nigra) acorns had 17% to 25% germination, while cherrybark oak (Q. pagoda) acorns were dead. Acorns stored fully hydrated faired far better after 2 years in storage, with germination ranging from 48% to 53% in water oak acorns, and from 67% to 76% in cherrybark oak acorns. Survival of acorns in the field was also dependent on moisture. The moderating effects of high relative humidity and rainfall throughout the collection period of the second experiment led to higher viability of white oak acorns left in the field for up to 15 days. We also observed a higher sucrose concentration in desiccating white oak acorns. While this increase may serve to initially protect cellular membranes in the acorn tissues, the mechanism is obviously not successful in preserving viability, which dropped rapidly after day 5 of the experiment.

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    Citation

    Connor, Kristina. 2009. Acorn storage: Can you really fool Mother Nature?. In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E., tech. coords. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2008. Proc. RMRS-P-58. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 108-113

    Keywords

    acorn storage, moisture content, insect damage, sucrose content

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