Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub

    Description

    Increasing criticism of resource-extractive and polluting heavy duty industries in urban
    areas, as well as continuing declines in timbering, farming and mining in rural areas, have
    created challenges for planners and policy makers seeking sustainable rural economies.
    Earlier studies have concluded that a “retiree economy” is a viable approach for rural
    economic sustainability. Using specific measures of natural amenities that are variant over
    time; this study examined the role that natural amenity resources have played in attracting
    retirees. Results reveal that the rural and biologically rich counties with substantial land use
    diversity, water amenities, and other man-modified natural and recreational attractions
    have great potential for attracting retirees. The findings from this study can be useful for
    local and regional agencies to identity their latent potential to promote retiree economy, and
    also to predict the future amenity demands. In addition, we draw other policy implications
    regarding regional economic growth and ecological concern in rural America.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Poudyal, Neelam C.; Hodges, Donald G.; Cordell, H. Ken. 2008. The role of natural resource amenities in attracting retirees: implications for economic growth policy. Ecological Economics, Vol. 68: 240-248.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/33666