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    Author(s): Gail Wells; Warren Devine; Connie Harrington
    Date: 2010
    Source: Science Findings 123. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p.
    Publication Series: Science Findings
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.0 MB)

    Description

    The decline of oak woodlands is an urgent conservation challenge in the Pacific Northwest. Prior to settlement by Euro-Americans, prairies, oak-dominated savannas, and oak woodlands were abundant in the low-lying areas of the region. Now it’s estimated that 1 to 5 percent of that native oak savanna remains. The rest has been supplanted by pastures, fields, Douglas-fir forests, and development. Experts agree that immediate intervention is needed if Oregon white oak ecosystems are to survive.

    Based on science by Warren Devine, and Connie Harrington.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Wells, Gail; Devine, Warren; Harrington, Connie. 2010. Great oaks from little acorns grow: planting native oak in the Pacific Northwest. Science Findings 123. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p.

    Keywords

    Warren Devine, Connie Harrington

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