Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Dale L. Bartos
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Binkley, Dan; Bartos, Dale L.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Eskew, Lane G., comps. Sustaining aspen in western landscapes: Symposium proceedings; 13-15 June 2000; Grand Junction, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-14.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (910.7 KB)

    Description

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is widely dispersed across the landscape of North America. Seventy-five percent of the aspen in the western United States occurs in the states of Colorado (50%) and Utah (25%). Reproduction in aspen is primarily by asexual means, e.g., root sprouts that are generally referred to as suckers. An aspen clone consists of numerous stems that are genetically alike that began from a single seed that germinated sometime in the past. Generally, these clones have been perpetuated on site by disturbance that allowed the clones to survive and expand in the area. The importance of aspen in the Interior West is well described and documented in the literature. Besides adding diversity to the landscape, aspen also provides water, forage, wood products, and so on for use by the public. Since European settlement, the natural disturbance regime (usually fire) has been interrupted. This has caused much of the aspen-dominated lands to succeed to conifers. The decline in aspen ranges from 49% in Colorado to 95% in Arizona. Numerous techniques are available to aid the manager in restoring aspen to a level approaching its historical occurrence.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Bartos, Dale L. 2001. Landscape dynamics of aspen and conifer forests. In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Binkley, Dan; Bartos, Dale L.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Eskew, Lane G., comps. Sustaining aspen in western landscapes: Symposium proceedings; 13-15 June 2000; Grand Junction, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-14.

    Keywords

    ecosystem management, ecosystem research, sustainable forests, quaking aspen, Populus tremuloides

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/35804