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    Author(s): Barry C. Johnston
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Binkley, Dan; Bartos, Dale L.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Eskew, Lane G., comps. Sustaining aspen in western landscapes: Symposium proceedings; 13-15 June 2000; Grand Junction, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 395-414.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (713.52 KB)

    Description

    In 1996, I inventoried over 90 aspen stands in 12 timber sales that had been clearcut >3 years previously. Units that regenerated adequately were larger, had higher slope angles, and had soils with a thick Mollic surface layer. Units that regenerated inadequately often had plant species that indicated high water tables. The factors associated with inadequate regeneration were high water tables, heavy browsing, soils with a thin Mollic surface layer, and logging practices that compact large portions of the unit. One of these factors alone often does not lead to inadequate aspen sprouting. Most often, inadequately regenerated aspen stands have two or more negative factors, so the factors act as cumulative stressors on aspen. It is important for managers to know soils, landforms, history, and behavior of animal populations in the area.

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    Citation

    Johnston, Barry C. 2001. Multiple factors affect aspen regeneration on the Uncompahgre Plateau, west-central Colorado. In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Binkley, Dan; Bartos, Dale L.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Eskew, Lane G., comps. Sustaining aspen in western landscapes: Symposium proceedings; 13-15 June 2000; Grand Junction, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 395-414.

    Keywords

    ecosystem management, ecosystem research, sustainable forests, quaking aspen, Populus tremuloides

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