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    Author(s): D.K. Rosenberg; B.R. Noon; E.C. Meslow
    Date: 1995
    Source: Pages 436-439 in J.A. Bissonette, and P.R. Krausman (eds.), Integrating people and wildlife for a sustainable future. International Wildlife Management Congress, Bethesda, Maryland
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (90.0 KB)

    Description

    Lack of clear, unambiguous criteria that distinguishes a linear habitat patch as a corridor contributes to controversy over the value of corridors for wildlife conservation. The definitions of biological corridors have been vague or inconsistent, and often they confound form and function. Explicit criteria that can differentiate between a linear habitat patch and a biological corridor have not been formulated. We reviewed the use of the term “corridor-’ in the ecological literature. and attempted to clarify the concept of biological corridor.

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    Citation

    Rosenberg, D.K.; Noon, B.R.; Meslow, E.C. 1995. Towards a definition of biological corridor. Pages 436-439 in J.A. Bissonette, and P.R. Krausman (eds.), Integrating people and wildlife for a sustainable future. International Wildlife Management Congress, Bethesda, Maryland

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