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    Author(s): P. Hanson; K. Nishida; P. Allen; E Chacón; B. Reichert; A. Castillo; M. Alfaro; L. Madrigal; E. Rojas; F. Badenes-Perez; T. Johnson
    Date: 2010
    Source: In: Loope, L.L., J.-Y. Meyer, B.D. Hardesty and C.W. Smith (eds.), Proceedings of the International Miconia Conference, Keanae, Maui, Hawaii, May 4-7, 2009, Maui Invasive Species Committee and Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa. 12 p. www.hear.org/conferences/miconia2009/proceedings/
    Publication Series: Other
    PDF: Download Publication  (101.07 KB)

    Description

    Research at the University of Costa Rica on potential biological control agents of Miconia calvescens was initiated in 2000. Although M. calvescens can be fairly common at certain sites, it is generally uncommon in Costa Rica and appears to be incapable of becoming established in forests with a closed canopy. Over fifty insect species have been identified as feeding on this plant, but most of these were excluded from further research because they are probably not sufficiently host-specific. Thus far we have focused our attention on six species that appear to be promising biological control agents: Diclidophlebia lucens (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a wax-producing sap-sucker on young shoots; Euselasia chrysippe (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae), whose caterpillars feed gregariously on the leaves; Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a stem borer; Anthonomus monostigma (Curculionidae), which feeds in the fruits; Ategumia dilecticolor (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a leaf-roller; and Mompha sp. (Lepidoptera: Momphidae), which feeds in fruits. The first three species have been sent to quarantine facilities in Hawa&i;i for further study, but a major problem that remains to be resolved is to find a way to breed Euselasia in captivity.

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    Citation

    Hanson, P.; Nishida, K.; Allen, P.; Chacón, E; Reichert, B.; Castillo, A.; Alfaro, M.; Madrigal, L.; Rojas, E.; Badenes-Perez, F.; Johnson, T. 2010. Insects that feed on Miconia calvescens in Costa Rica. In: Loope, L.L., J.-Y. Meyer, B.D. Hardesty and C.W. Smith (eds.), Proceedings of the International Miconia Conference, Keanae, Maui, Hawaii, May 4-7, 2009, Maui Invasive Species Committee and Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa. 12 p. www.hear.org/conferences/miconia2009/proceedings/

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/36957