Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Eric J. GustafsonBrian R. Sturtevant; Anatoly S. Shvidenko; Robert M. Scheller
    Date: 2010
    Source: In: Li, Chao; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Chen, Jiquan. Landscape Ecology in Forest Management and Conservation, Challenges and Solutions for Global Change. Dordrecht, The Netherlands; Springer: 99-118. Chapter 5.
    Publication Series: Other
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (10.36 MB)

    Description

    Managers of forested landscapes must account for multiple, interacting ecological processes operating at broad spatial and temporal scales. These interactions can be of such complexity that predictions of future forest ecosystem states are beyond the analytical capability of the human mind. Landscape disturbance and succession models (LDSM) are predictive and analytical tools that can integrate these processes and provide critical decision support information. We briefly review the state of the art of LDSMs and provide two case studies to illustrate the application and utility of one LDSM, LANDIS. We conclude that LDSMs are able to provide useful information to support management decisions for a number of reasons: (i) they operate at scale that is relevant to many forest management problems, (ii) they account for interactions among ecological and anthropogenic processes, (iii) they can produce objective and comparable projections of alternative management options or various global change scenarios, (iv) LDSMs are based on current ecological knowledge and theory, (v) LDSMs provide a vehicle for collaboration among decision-makers, resource experts and scientists, (vi) LDSMs are the only feasible research tool that can be used to investigate long-term, large area dynamics.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Gustafson, Eric J.; Sturtevant, Brian R.; Shvidenko, Anatoly S.; Scheller, Robert M. 2010. Using landscape disturbance and succession models to support forest management. In: Li, Chao; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Chen, Jiquan. Landscape Ecology in Forest Management and Conservation, Challenges and Solutions for Global Change. Dordrecht, The Netherlands; Springer: 99-118. Chapter 5.

    Keywords

    Landscape models, disturbance, decision support, scale

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/37353