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    Description

    Without collaboration, conservation is impossible for long-distance migrants such as the Cerulean Warbler, a declining forest breeding bird in North America that overwinters in the Andes Mountains of South America. The Cerulean Warbler, one of the fastest declining woodland birds of eastern North America, is considered Vulnerable by BirdLife international, in the Yellow category on the National Audubon/American Bird Conservancy WatchList, and on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) national Birds of Conservation Concern list. Given the conservation status of the Cerulean and the number of partners interested in its research and conservation, the Cerulean Warbler Technical Group coalesced in 2002 at the first Cerulean Warbler Summit in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. During this meeting, working groups were established to coordinate the assessment of critically important parts of the species’ biology for conservation purposes. One of these working groups addressed the non-breeding season and named itself “El Grupo Cerúleo.”

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    Citation

    Mehlman, David; Hamel, Paul. 2010. El Grupo Cerúleo: Cooperation for Non-breeding Season Conservation of the Cerulean Warbler. The All-Bird Bulletin Summer 2010:2-4.

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