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    Author(s): Nabil Khudduri
    Date: 2010
    Source: In: Riley, L. E.; Pinto, J. R.; Dumroese, R. K., tech. cords. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2009. Proc. RMRS-P-62. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 48-52.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (502.12 KB)

    Description

    We transplanted one-year old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) seedlings into compost-amended soil that had either been spring-fumigated with a methyl bromide/chloropicrin combination or left unfumigated. Seedling nutrient, pathology, morphology, and packout measurements were significantly better for those transplanted into fumigated rather than non-fumigated soil, regardless of compost treatment. Among seedlings transplanted into non-fumigated soil, those grown in the biosolid and bark-based composts had the highest average number of packable seedlings.

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    Citation

    Khudduri, Nabil. 2010. Effect of organic amendments on Douglas-fir transplants grown in fumigated versus non-fumigated soil. In: Riley, L. E.; Pinto, J. R.; Dumroese, R. K., tech. cords. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2009. Proc. RMRS-P-62. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 48-52.

    Keywords

    seedlings, root disease, methyl bromide, compost, pest management

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