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    Author(s): Richard A. Sniezko; Anna Schoettle; Joan Dunlap; Detlev Vogler; David Conklin; Andrew Bower; Chris Jensen; Rob Mangold; Doug Daoust; Gary Man
    Date: 2011
    Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 147-149.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (232.98 KB)

    Description

    The eight white pine species native to the western United States face an array of biotic and abiotic challenges that impact the viability of populations or the species themselves. Well-established programs are already in place to conserve and restore Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don and P. lambertiana Dougl. throughout significant portions of their geographic ranges. More recently, programs have been initiated for the other six species: P. albicaulis Engelm., P. aristata Engelm., P. balfouriana Grev. & Balf., P. flexilis James, P. longaeva D.K. Bailey, and, P. strobiformis Engelm. In December 2008, concerns about the future of one of these species, P. albicaulis (whitebark pine), led one group to propose 'Listing' of this species under the Endangered Species Act (Natural Resource Defense Council 2008); a status review of the species is now underway, and a 12-month petition finding is expected in July 2011 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2010).

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    Citation

    Sniezko, Richard A.; Schoettle, Anna; Dunlap, Joan; Vogler, Detlev; Conklin, David; Bower, Andrew; Jensen, Chris; Mangold, Rob; Daoust, Doug; Man, Gary. 2011. Ex Situ gene conservation in high elevation white pine species in the United States-a beginning. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 147-149.

    Keywords

    high elevation five-needle pines, threats, whitebark, Pinus albicaulis, limber, Pinus flexilis, southwestern white, Pinus strobiformis, foxtail, Pinus balfouriana, Great Basin bristlecone, Pinus longaeva, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata

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