Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Vicki SaabRobin E. Russell; Jay Rotella; Jonathan G. Dudley
    Date: 2011
    Source: Journal of Wildlife Management. 75(4): 794-804.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (165.44 KB)

    Description

    Salvage logging practices in recently burned forests often have direct effects on species associated with dead trees, particularly cavity-nesting birds. As such, evaluation of postfire management practices on nest survival rates of cavity nesters is necessary for determining conservation strategies. We monitored 1,797 nests of 6 cavity-nesting bird species: Lewis's woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), hairy woodpecker (Picoides villosus), black-backed woodpecker (P. arcticus), northern flicker (Colaptes auratus), western bluebird (Sialia mexicana), and mountain bluebird (S. currucoides) from 1994 to 2004 in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed-severity burned forests (partially logged and unlogged) of Idaho, USA. Based on a priori hypotheses, we modeled daily survival rate (DSR) of nests as a function of abiotic (temperature, precipitation), temporal (time since fire, calendar year) and biotic factors (distance to unburned forest, nest height, and tree harvest [partial-salvage logging vs. unlogged]). Multiple abiotic and biotic factors, other than direct effects of salvage logging, affected daily survival rates of breeding cavity-nesting birds. Hairy woodpecker was the only species in which partial-salvage logging had a measurable, negative impact on DSR. Managers implementing carefully planned salvage logging prescriptions that include both unlogged reserves and partially logged areas can expect to maintain habitat for successfully breeding cavity-nesting birds of the interior northwestern United States. Our results also suggest that nest survival for some species of cavitynesting birds could be improved if unlogged reserves are located centrally in postfire forests, distant from unburned habitats that potentially serve as sources of nest predators.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Saab, Victoria A.; Russell, Robin E.; Rotella, Jay; Dudley, Jonathan G. 2011. Modeling nest survival of cavity-nesting birds in relation to postfire salvage logging. Journal of Wildlife Management. 75(4): 794-804.

    Keywords

    cavity-nesting birds, Colaptes auratus, Melanerpes lewis, nest survival, Picoides spp., Pinus ponderosa, salvage logging, Sialia spp., wildfire

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/38683