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    Author(s): Rupert Summerson; Tina Tin
    Date: 2011
    Source: In: Watson, Alan; Murrieta-Saldivar, Joaquin; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Proceedings RMRS-P-64. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 178-181.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (165.23 KB)

    Description

    Antarctica is designated by the Antarctic Treaty System as a "natural reserve devoted to peace and science" (http://www.ats.aq/index_e.htm). Multiple, and sometimes conflicting, values are protected. In a place where wilderness protection and certain forms of human activity are both prized, a discussion of the protection of the Antarctic wilderness necessarily leads to the question of the present and future human footprint in Antarctica. A comprehensive and systematic assessment of the human footprint in Antarctica has never been done, and in this paper the authors explore the opportunities and challenges in conducting such an assessment. On examining the exchange of information conducted under the Antarctic Treaty System, one finds that the information on human activity in Antarctica is relatively centralized, and that with the right permissions, together with dedicated and significant effort, it should be possible to assemble all information in one place. After that, the next challenge lies in the representation of this data in a coherent manner that would be useful for planning purposes. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are a useful tool for representing this data; however, much work still needs to be done to arrive at a system that is clear, transparent, and reproducible and can illustrate the impacts of human activities on wilderness character or values.

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    Citation

    Summerson, Rupert; Tin, Tina. 2011. Protection of the wilderness and aesthetic values of Antarctica: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as a tool. In: Watson, Alan; Murrieta-Saldivar, Joaquin; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Proceedings RMRS-P-64. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 178-181.

    Keywords

    wilderness, biodiversity, conservation, protected areas, economics, subsistence, tourism, traditional knowledge, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values, Antarctica, Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/38792