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    Author(s): Mark L. Lord; David G. Jewett; Jerry R. Miller; Dru Germanoski; Jeanne C. Chambers
    Date: 2011
    Source: In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Miller, Jerry R., eds. Geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology of Great Basin meadow complexes - implications for management and restoration. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-258. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 44-67.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (6.06 MB)

    Description

    The hydrologic regime exerts primary control on riparian meadow complexes and is strongly influenced by past and present geomorphic processes; biotic processes; and, in some cases, anthropogenic activities. Thus, it is essential to understand not only the hydrologic processes that operate within meadow complexes but also the interactions of meadow hydrology with other processes that affect these ecosystems. Regional- and watershed-scale analyses have contributed to the understanding and management of meadows. However, investigation of meadow-scale characteristics and processes have shown that local factors can override larger-scale influences and that some processes, especially those related to groundwater hydrology, cannot be fully explained by topographically defined watershed-scale characteristics (Montgomery 1999; Winter 2001; Devito and others 2005). In this chapter, we provide an overview of the hydrologic setting within the Great Basin and describe and explain key aspects of meadow hydrology for specific sites within selected watersheds in central Nevada. Next, we discuss generalities in the hydrologic characteristics of 56 meadows that were assessed in these upland watersheds. We conclude by providing an approach for characterizing hydrologic conditions based on hydrologic setting, groundwater conditions, vegetation patterns, and stream connections.

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    Citation

    Lord, Mark L.; Jewett, David G.; Miller, Jerry R.; Germanoski, Dru; Chambers, Jeanne C. 2011. Hydrologic processes influencing meadow ecosystems [chapter 4]. In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Miller, Jerry R., eds. Geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology of Great Basin meadow complexes - implications for management and restoration. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-258. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 44-67.

    Keywords

    riparian areas, wetlands, semi-arid ecosystems, degradation, stream incision, stabilization

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