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    Author(s): Dean Pearson; Steve Sutherland; Jack Butler; Jane Smith; Carolyn Sieg
    Date: 2011
    Source: In: Pearson, D. E.; Kim, M.; Butler, J., eds. 2011. Rocky Mountain Research Station invasive species visionary white paper. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-265. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 6-12.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (221.29 KB)

    Description

    Exotic plants dramatically impact natural communities and disrupt ecosystem services (Mack and others 2000). Although the bulk of current impacts are caused by relatively few exotic species, many additional exotics that are currently established at low levels are increasing in density and distribution and present substantial imminent threats. Additionally, new exotic plants will likely continue to be deliberately and accidentally introduced, which represents a potential pool of new invasive species. Managers have responded to the threat of invasive species in wildlands with a significant increase in the use of current management tools. However, many of the tools now being applied to wildland exotic plant management, such as herbicides and classical biocontrol, originated in intensive agricultural systems and are proving to be more challenging to apply over large areas in complex ecosystems (Pearson and Ortega 2009). Finally, exotic plant invasions are commonly exacerbated by disturbances such as wildfires, timber harvest, road building, burning, and grazing by livestock and native herbivores. The combined effects of multiple and interacting disturbances on populations of exotic plant species, especially in the face of projected climate change, are uncertain but potentially severe (Sieg and others 2010).

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    Citation

    Pearson, Dean; Sutherland, Steve; Butler, Jack; Smith, Jane; Sieg, Carolyn. 2011. I. Plants. In: Pearson, D. E.; Kim, M.; Butler, J., eds. 2011. Rocky Mountain Research Station invasive species visionary white paper. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-265. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 6-12.

    Keywords

    invasive species, exotic, noxious, nonnative, pathogen, rehabilitation, restoration

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