Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Ned B. KlopfensteinBrian W. Geils
    Date: 2011
    Source: In: Pearson, D. E.; Kim, M.; Butler, J., eds. 2011. Rocky Mountain Research Station invasive species visionary white paper. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-265. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 13-26.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (266.73 KB)

    Description

    Invasive fungal pathogens have caused immeasurably large ecological and economic damage to forests. It is well known that invasive fungal pathogens can cause devastating forest diseases (e.g., white pine blister rust, chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, dogwood anthracnose, butternut canker, Scleroderris canker of pines, sudden oak death, pine pitch canker) (Maloy 1997; Anagnostakis 1987; Brasier and Buck 2001; Daughtrey and others 1996; Furnier and others 1999; Hamelin and others 1998; Davidson and others 2003; Gordon and others 2001). Furthermore, invasive pathogenic fungi have disrupted many forest ecosystems and threaten to eliminate some tree species (Liebhold and others 1995). RMRS research has historically emphasized white pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola, because of the extensive damage to five-needled white pines that are a keystone species to many forest ecosystems in the Interior West since its introduction to North America in the late 1800s. However, this disease continues to spread to new areas and environments.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Klopfenstein, Ned B.; Geils, Brian W. 2011. II. Pathogens. In: Pearson, D. E.; Kim, M.; Butler, J., eds. 2011. Rocky Mountain Research Station invasive species visionary white paper. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-265. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 13-26.

    Keywords

    invasive species, exotic, noxious, nonnative, pathogen, rehabilitation, restoration

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/39560