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Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites

Year:

2011

Publication type:

Full Proceedings

Primary Station(s):

Forest Products Laboratory

Source:

Proceedings, one hundred seventh annual meeting of the American Wood Protection Association ... Fort Lauderdale, Florida, May 15-17, 2011: Volume 107. Birmingham, Ala. : American Wood Protection Association, c2011: p. 121-127.

Description

Purified primary metabolites from essential oils were previously shown to be bioactive inhibitors of mold fungi on unleached Southern pine sapwood, either alone or in synergy with a second metabolite. This study evaluated the leachability of these compounds in Southern pine that was either dip- or vacuum-treated. Following laboratory leach tests, specimens were evaluated for inhibition of mold growth for 12 weeks and analyzed quantitatively by GC-MS for residual metabolite(s). With the exception of geraniol, vacuum treating the specimens generally provided longer protection than dip-treating. Citronellol and carvone protected vacuum-treated specimens from mold growth for the 4-week duration of the ASTM D4445-10 test, but efficacy diminished after extending incubation beyond 4 weeks. Thymol completely inhibited mold growth for 12 weeks in both dip-treated and vacuum impregnated specimens even though GC-MS analysis showed that 49% thymol leached from the vacuum-treated specimens.

Citation

Clausen, Carol A.; Yang, Vina W. 2011. Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites. In: Proceedings, one hundred seventh annual meeting of the American Wood Protection Association, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 2011 May 15-17: Volume 107. Birmingham, AL: American Wood Protection Association, c2011: p. 121-127.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/40421