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    Author(s): Charles Haecker
    Date: 2012
    Source: In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 131-142.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.24 MB)

    Description

    In a literal sense "historical artifacts" and "historical sites" are all artifacts and sites dating after the introduction of written history in any region. For example, in New Mexico, these would be sites dating after AD 1540, the year of the first Spanish entrada into what would later become the State of New Mexico. In many instances, historical sites can also include those sites created by American Indians who possessed at least some Euro-American objects, and/or whose methods of construction were influenced to some degree by Euro-Americans. The National Historic Preservation Act defines antiquities as over 50 years old; therefore, even late 20th century historical sites may be considered eligible to the National Register of Historic Places. (It is important to note that only cultural resource specialists can make a determination regarding the eligibility of a cultural resource to the National Register of Historic Places; see chapter 1.) Given this time depth and regional/ethnic diversity there exists a wide variety of historic architectural designs made of materials such as adobe, sod, logs, planks, firebrick, formed concrete and, quite often, combinations thereof. Artifacts present at even the most humble of historical sites can number into the thousands; virtually anything listed in a nineteenth century mail-order catalog could be found on a frontier ranch.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Haecker, Charles. 2012. Fire effects on materials of the historic period [Chapter 6]. In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 131-142.

    Keywords

    cultural resources, heritage resources, archaeology, fire regime, fire environment, fuels management, fire management, fire planning, wildfire, prescribed fire, First-Order fire effects, Second-Order fire effects, Third-Order fire effects, Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER), fire severity, traditional cultural knowledge (TKE), cultural landscapes

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