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Enzymatic mechanism of oxalate production in the TCA and glyoxylate pathways using various isolates of Antrodia radiculosa

Author(s):

Year:

2011

Publication type:

Full Proceedings

Primary Station(s):

Forest Products Laboratory

Source:

Proceedings, one hundred seventh annual meeting of the American Wood Protection Association ... Fort Lauderdale, Florida, May 15-17, 2011: Volume 107. Birmingham, Ala. : American Wood Protection Association, c2011: p. 108-113.

Description

Brown-rot fungi produce oxalate in large amounts; however, levels of accumulation and function vary by species. Copper-tolerant fungi, like Antrodia radiculosa, produce and accumulate high levels of oxalate in response to copper. Oxalate biosynthesis in copper-tolerant fungi has been linked to the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles. Within these two cycles, it has been proposed that oxalate production relies on twelve specific enzymes. In this study, Antrodia radiculosa isolates causing decay of untreated and 1.2% copper citrate treated wood were used to evaluate oxalate concentration and enzyme activity in five of the twelve enzymes. The enzyme activity of fumarase, glyoxylate dehydrogenase, isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, and oxaloacetase, was determined. Future gene expression analysis will determine any variations in enzymatic activity, as well as attempt to establish a pathway involved in the direct production of oxalate.

Citation

Jenkins, K.M.; Diehl, S.V.; Clausen, C.A.; Green, F. 2011. Enzymatic mechanism of oxalate production in the TCA and glyoxylate pathways using various isolates of Antrodia radiculosa. In: Proceedings, one hundred seventh annual meeting of the American Wood Protection Association, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 2011 May 15-17: Volume 107. Birmingham, AL: American Wood Protection Association, c2011: p. 108-113.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/40526