Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Patricia L. Winter; George T. Cvetkovich
    Date: 2008
    Source: In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds. Recreation visitor research: studies of diversity. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-210. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 97-111. Chapter 9
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (493.91 KB)

    Description

    This paper presents an examination of trust in the Forest Service to manage threatened and endangered species as measured through a survey of residents of four Southwestern States. Of particular interest were variations by ethnic/racial group, gender, concern about threatened and endangered species, and self-assessed knowledge. Increasing diversity in the United States makes explorations of trust in natural resource managing agencies especially important to understand. Expected trust levels among groups of color compared to Whites was not especially clear to us. Some very convincing arguments in natural resource management literature suggesting distrust should be expected among groups of color, while an expectation of higher trust among groups of color also finds strong support. A marginally lower level was found among people who engaged in more frequent outdoor recreation, and who visited national forests more often. Time in the United States was associated with lower trust levels among our non-U.S. born respondents. However, the most influential variables among those we considered were gender, ethnic/racial group, concern, knowledge, and perceived similarity of values to the Forest Service (the most significant of those examined). Findings suggest additional research is needed to fully illuminate the complexities of trust in our diverse society, as implications for natural resource management spill over into communication and collaboration efforts.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Winter, Patricia L.; Cvetkovich, George T. 2008. Southwesterners’ views of threatened and endangered species management: does ethnic/racial diversity make a difference? In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds. Recreation visitor research: studies of diversity. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-210. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 97-111. Chapter 9.

    Keywords

    Ethnic and racial diversity, salient values similarity, trust, concern, knowledge

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/40636