Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Patricia L. WinterDeborah J. Chavez
    Date: 2008
    Source: In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds. Recreation visitor research: studies of diversity. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-210. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 163-174. Chapter 14
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (478.47 KB)

    Description

    Wilderness and day use recreationists’ preferences for natural resource management and their perceptions of purposes for management are examined in this paper. Environmental identity (EID) salience is used to help shed light on variations in recreationists’ preferences for how natural resources should be managed. Findings from two studies are reported; the first was from a survey of urban-proximate wilderness visitors, the second from visitors to day use areas. Both studies were conducted on national forest lands. The two studies incorporated similar items to allow comparisons. In both cases, recreationists were asked to evaluate the relative importance of natural resource areas for low-impact recreation opportunities, high-impact recreation opportunities, and for environmental protection purposes. In addition, they were asked to indicate if more, less, or the same amount of area should be set aside for each of these purposes. Strong support for environmental protection purposes was found in both studies. Support for additional areas allocated to environmental protection and low-impact recreation was also found, particularly among the day users. Our findings indicate that management of recreation opportunities can include considerations of sustainability as important to recreationists. Environmental identity seemed helpful in understanding management preferences in that significant relationships between high environmental identity and support for natural resource protection were revealed. The EID scale worked well among White respondents as well as among groups of color. The environmental identity construct may be of assistance in furthering our understanding of land management preferences and provides an additional point of context beyond place attachment.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Winter, Patricia L.; Chavez, Deborah J. 2008. Wildland recreationists' natural resource management purposes and preferences: a connection to environmental identity. In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds. Recreation visitor research: studies of diversity. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-210. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 163-174. Chapter 14.

    Keywords

    Environmental identity salience, management preferences, recreationists

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/40639