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Management Implications of Interactions between the Spruce Budworm and Spruce-Fir Stands

Author(s):

John A. Witter
Bruce A. Montgomery

Year:

1983

Publication type:

Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Primary Station(s):

Northern Research Station

Historical Station(s):

Northeastern Research Station

Source:

In: Talerico, Robert L.; Montgomery, Michael, tech. coords. Proceedings, forest defoliator--host interactions: A comparison between gypsy moth and spruce budworms; 1983 April 5-7; New Haven, CT. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-85. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 127-132.

Description

The impact of the budworm on trees and stands and conditions that lead to susceptible and vulnerable stands are discussed. Long-term and short-term options dealing with the spruce budworm problem are presented. Examples of questions that plant-animal interaction research have answered are presented in the following scenarios: ( 1) can the release phase of an outbreak be detected, (2) can spruce budworm impact be predicted, (3) are regionwide rating systems accurate, and (4) what, if any, relationships exist between site classification units and spruce budworm impact.

Citation

Witter, John A.; Lynch, Ann M.; Montgomery, Bruce A. 1983. Management Implications of Interactions between the Spruce Budworm and Spruce-Fir Stands. In: Talerico, Robert L.; Montgomery, Michael, tech. coords. Proceedings, forest defoliator--host interactions: A comparison between gypsy moth and spruce budworms; 1983 April 5-7; New Haven, CT. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-85. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 127-132.

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/4102