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    Author(s): M North; R. Rojas
    Date: 2012
    Source: In: North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 117-125
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (411.71 KB)

    Description

    Designing and implementing vegetation treatments that can move a forest landscape toward a desired future condition is often challenging. Faced with diverse stakeholder interests and the unknown effects of changing climate conditions, managers need to engage and build collaborative projects. One such effort is the Dinkey project designed to help restore a healthy, diverse, fire-resilient forest structure while maintaining and enhancing habitat for fisher (Martes pennanti) and California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). The project retained tree species and size classes that are the most drought tolerant; more resistant to insects, diseases, and air pollution; and have higher rates of postwildfire survival. Surface and ladder fuels were decreased to reduce the probabilities of crown fire ignition and fire severity. Large woody debris and higher canopy closure were retained in some areas that may provide suitable habitat for sensitive species. Some torching and tree mortality were considered acceptable to support cavity nesting and denning structures, and a range of ecosystem functions over time. In areas where a reduction in potential fire intensity was essential, treatment included separating tree crowns to reduce the potential for crown-fire spread. Forest health and resilience were promoted by increasing the forest's capacity to withstand short-term impacts (e.g., drought) without causing long-term changes in the system's overall function. Mechanical, hand, and prescribed fire tools were used to meet these goals. The project was also designed to be conducted in an economically efficient manner with minimal outside funding.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    North, M; Rojas, R. 2012. Chapter 11: Dinkey north and south project. In: North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 117-125.

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