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    Author(s): Richard C. Cobb; David M. Rizzo
    Date: 2012
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Weller, Theodore J.; Piirto, Douglas D.; Stuart, John D., tech. coords. Proceedings of coast redwood forests in a changing California: A symposium for scientists and managers. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-238. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 357-362
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (266.57 KB)

    Description

    Phytophthora ramorum is an emergent pathogen in redwood forests which causes the disease sudden oak death. Although the disease does not kill coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), extensive and rapid mortality of tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) has removed this important tree in much of the central and southern distribution of the redwood forest type. Understanding how the pathogen has altered redwood ecosystem processes is essential to assessing the costs and benefits of disease management. However, almost no published studies have reported baseline rates of ecosystem processes for redwood forests. How substantial are P. ramorum impacts on redwood ecosystem processes? What mechanisms are responsible for ecosystem change in these forests? We conducted a series of field studies quantifying soil N cycling, litterfall, and litter decomposition to begin addressing these questions. The objective of this paper is to report baseline rates of nutrient cycling for redwood forests and summarize the overall affects of sudden oak death on these processes.

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    Citation

    Cobb, Richard C.; Rizzo, David M. 2012. Decomposition and N cycling changes in redwood forests caused by sudden oak death. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Weller, Theodore J.; Piirto, Douglas D.; Stuart, John D., tech. coords. Proceedings of coast redwood forests in a changing California: A symposium for scientists and managers. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-238. Albany, CA: USDA-Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 357-362.

    Keywords

    decomposition, litterfall, nitrogen mineralization, Phytophthora ramorum, redwood, selective species removal, sudden oak death

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