Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Lawrence E. Band; T. Hwang; T.C. Hales; James VoseChelcy Ford
    Date: 2012
    Source: Geomorphology 137(1):159-167
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Southern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.21 MB)

    Description

    Mountain watersheds are sources of a set of valuable ecosystem services as well as potential hazards. The former include high quality freshwater, carbon sequestration, nutrient retention, and biodiversity, whereas the latter include flash floods, landslides and forest fires. Each of these ecosystem services and hazards represents different elements of the integrated and co-evolved ecological, hydrological and geomorphic subsystems of the watershed and should be approached analytically as a coupled land system. Forest structure and species are important influences on the partitioning of precipitation, the lateral redistribution of water, runoff and sediment production, weathering and soil development. Forest regulation of hydrologic dynamics contributes to the development of patterns of soil pore pressure and slope instability during storms or snowmelt. The spatial patterns of root depth, structure and strength, developed by the below ground allocation of carbon in the forest canopy in response to limiting resources of water and nutrients, contributes to slope stability and drainage, and the maintenance of stomatal conductance linking water and carbon cycling. This in turn provides the photosynthate required to build leaf area, stem and root biomass. The linked ecological, hydrologic and geomorphic systems are characterized by specific catenary patterns that should be captured in any coupled modeling approach. In this paper we extend an ecohydrological modeling approach to include hydrologic and canopy structural pattern impacts on slope stability, with explicit feedbacks between ecosystem water, carbon and nutrient cycling, and the transient development of landslide potential in steep forested catchments. Using measured distributions of canopy leaf area index, and empirically modeled soil depth and root cohesion, the integrated model is able to generate localized areas of past instability without specific calibration or training with mapped landslides. As the model has previously been shown to simulate space/time patterns of coupled water, carbon and nutrient cycling, the integration of slope stability as a function of hydrologic, ecosystem and geomorphic processes provides the ability to closely link multiple ecosystem services with a unified approach.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Band, Lawrence E.; Hwang, T.; Hales, T.C.; Vose, James; Ford, Chelcy. 2012. Ecosystem processes at the watershed scale: mapping and modeling ecohydrological controls. Geomorphology 137(1):159-167.

    Cited

    Google Scholar

    Keywords

    Ecohydrology, Slope Stability, Distributed simulation

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/41288