Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Paul Sclafani; Christopher I. Thornton; Amanda L. Cox; Steven R. Abt
    Date: 2012
    Source: Prepared for U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Albuquerque Area Office. Fort Collins, CO: Colorado State University, Engineering Research Center. 313 p.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (3.42 MB)

    Description

    As with every natural process, river morphology incorporates a complex and nuanced set of processes that combine to produce an infinite set of possible outcomes. Natural laws that govern natural systems cause rivers to react to changes in the environment in order to maintain equilibrium. Changes in hydraulics, sediment transport, and habitat help keep natural systems in balance. Natural reactions can be predictable, such as seasonal variations in weather patterns, or quite unpredictable, such as major flooding events or tectonic activity. Human impact to the environment is rarely subtle and often times can produce catastrophic changes to natural ecosystems. Virtually all watersheds within the continental United States have been impacted by increasing human population and development (Knighton 1998, Wohl 2004). As a result of such profound alterations to the environment, humans have been subjected to flooding, mudslides, droughts, and other extreme environmental processes.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Sclafani, Paul; Thornton, Christopher I.; Cox, Amanda L.; Abt, Steven R. 2012. Methodology for predicting maximum velocity and shear stress in a sinuous channel with bendway weirs using 1-D HEC-RAS modeling results. Prepared for U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Albuquerque Area Office. Fort Collins, CO: Colorado State University, Engineering Research Center. 313 p.

    Keywords

    channel, velocity, shear stress, bendway weirs

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page