Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): S. Kelso; C. Hall; G. Maentz
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 13-19.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (653.42 KB)

    Description

    Landscape anomalies are regionally restricted habitats created by unusual geologic, edaphic, or hydrologic factors. Barrens, cliff faces, canyons, hanging gardens, and playas are all examples of landscape anomalies in the arid Southwest. Such sites often harbor an unusual and rich flora, including endemic, disjunct, or relictual plant species. Using examples from our studies on the chalk barrens and riparian canyons of southeast Colorado, we show how regional diversity can be enriched by the biota of habitats that are small in extent but biologically distinctive. Landscape anomalies are relatively easily surveyed and monitored, provide opportunities for comparative studies, and can serve as flagship habitats for capturing public interest. Because of their small size, however, they may be easily destroyed by development or overlooked in regional planning. Although coarse filter conservation approaches can be effective for the protection of regional ecosystems, a focus on small landscape anomalies as specific conservation targets may also be desirable to protect biota with low prominence but high biogeographic significance.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Kelso, S.; Hall, C.; Maentz, G. 2001. The role of landscape anomalies in regional plant conservation. In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 13-19.

    Keywords

    plant conservation, genetics, demography, reproductive biology, monitoring, endangered species

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/41900