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    Author(s): Joanne E. Baggs; Joyce Maschinski
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 176-185.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (856.5 KB)

    Description

    Central to the conservation of the federally endangered Purshia subintegra (Arizona cliffrose) is development of an understanding of its cultivation requirements. This knowledge will enable us to augment declining or threatened populations as well as preserve genotypes impacted by human activities. We studied seed and stem cutting propagation of P. subintegra. The highest success rate for rooted stem cuttings of P. subintegra that were collected wild was 34 percent. The stem cuttings of P. subintegra survived best when they were taken in the fall, rooted in perlite with Hormex 8, and watered once daily. Stem cuttings can take from 1 to 11 months to root depending on treatment and time of cutting. Propagation from seed was much more successful (88%) when we used fresh seed sown in perlite with cold stratification for 4 weeks. Seeds did not require native soil to germinate, nor did seedlings require native soil to survive. This means that P. subintegra can propagate and survive under conditions far different than it experiences in the field. Because road construction is destroying P. subintegra and its habitat, transplanting propagules to unoccupied habitat may prove to be an important avenue for conserving genotypes. Following our successful propagation trials, we introduced P. subintegra into its natural habitat in the Verde Valley in February 2000. We tested whether irrigating plants for 5 months increased survival and found that supplemental water was important to the survival of transplanted plants. For rare plants, we need a much greater knowledge base on how to grow and transplant them. This process is time consuming, but will be necessary as more and more species that are impacted by human disturbance must be conserved ex situ.

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    Citation

    Baggs, Joanne E.; Maschinski, Joyce. 2001. From the greenhouse to the field: Cultivation requirements of Arizona cliffrose (Purshia subintegra). In: Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. Southwestern rare and endangered plants: Proceedings of the Third Conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 176-185.

    Keywords

    plant conservation, genetics, demography, reproductive biology, monitoring, endangered species

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/41918