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Microclimate: an alternative to tree vigor as a basis for mountain pine beetle infestations

Author(s):

Gene D. Amman

Year:

1989

Publication type:

Research Paper (RP)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Historical Station(s):

Intermountain Forest Experiment Station

Source:

Res. Pap. INT-RP-400. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 10 p.

Description

Thinning lodgepole pine stands increased light intensity, wind movement, insolation, and temperature. Temperatures on the south exposure of tree trunks and of soil were significantly higher in thinned than unthinned stands. Light and wind also were higher in the thinned stand. Fewer mountain pine beetles were caught in pheromone-baited traps in a thinned than in an adjacent unthinned stand. Percentage of trees killed by mountain pine beetle was only 2 percent in a thinned stand compared to 16 percent in an adjacent unthinned stand.

Citation

Bartos, Dale L; Amman, Gene D. 1989. Microclimate: an alternative to tree vigor as a basis for mountain pine beetle infestations. Res. Pap. INT-RP-400. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 10 p.

Cited

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/43374