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    Author(s): Dale L. Bartos
    Date: 1997
    Source: In: Abstracts: 50th Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management; Rapid City, South Dakota; February 16-21, 1997. Denver, CO: Society for Range Management. p. 57.
    Publication Series: Abstract
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.14 MB)

    Description

    It is commonly recognized that aspen (Populus tremuloides) ecosystems in the Interior West provide numerous benefits: (1) forage for livestock, (2) habitat for wildlife, (3) water for downstream users, (4) esthetics, (5) sites for recreational opportunities, (6) wood fiber, and (7) landscape diversity. Loss or potential loss of aspen on these lands can be attributed primarily to the successional process, reduction (or elimination) of fire, and long-term overuse by ungulates. Western aspen forests are unique because they reproduce primarily by suckering from the parent root system.

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    Citation

    Bartos, Dale L. 1997. Decline of aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Interior West [Abstract 2]. In: Abstracts: 50th Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management; Rapid City, South Dakota; February 16-21, 1997. Denver, CO: Society for Range Management. p. 57.

    Keywords

    aspen, Populus tremuloides, decline

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