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    Author(s): Erik J. Martinson; Philip N. Omi
    Date: 2013
    Source: Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-103WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 38 p.
    Publication Series: Research Paper (RP)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.29 MB)

    Description

    We employed meta-analysis and information theory to synthesize findings reported in the literature on the effects of fuel treatments on subsequent fire intensity and severity. Data were compiled from 19 publications that reported observed fire responses from 62 treated versus untreated contrasts. Effect sizes varied widely and the most informative grouping of studies distinguished three vegetation types and three types of fuel treatment. The resultant meta-analytic model is highly significant (p<0.001) and explains 78% of the variability in reported observations of fuel treatment effectiveness. Our synthesis highlights several considerations that both support and inform the current fuels management paradigm.

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    Citation

    Martinson, Erik J.; Omi, Philip N. 2013. Fuel treatments and fire severity: A meta-analysis. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-103WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 38 p.

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    Keywords

    thinning, prescribed burning, wildfire, effect size, synthesis

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