Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): A. W. Schoettle; R. A. Sniezko; A. Kegley; R. Danchok; K. S. Burns
    Date: 2012
    Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J. 2012. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. p. 336.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (126.42 KB)

    Description

    The core distribution of Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata Engelm., extends from central Colorado into northern New Mexico, with a disjunct population on the San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona. Populations are primarily at high elevations and often define the alpine treeline; however, the species can also be found in open mixed conifer stands with ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) and/or pinyon (Pinus edulis Engelm.) pines in some locations. On dry, exposed sites the stands are open and sparse and Rocky Mountain bristlecone (hereafter referred to as bristlecone) is commonly the only species present. The combination of the pine's adaptive traits with infrequent disturbance has enabled trees on these sites to attain ages of over 2,500 years. These same traits and conditions, which contribute to a long generation time, will inevitably hinder the ability of bristlecone pine to adapt to novel anthropogenic stresses such as climate change and infection by the non-native pathogen (Cronartium ribicola) that causes the lethal disease white pine blister rust (WPBR). Infection of bristlecone pine by C. ribicola was first documented in the field in 2003 in south-central Colorado. Rapid climate warming and the associated increase in mountain pine beetle activity are also affecting these high elevation ecosystems. These threats and the species' unique aesthetic and ecological roles make bristlecone pine a species of conservation interest. Blister rust invasion is relatively recent compared to the generation time of bristlecone pine, thus we still have a window of opportunity to gain and utilize new knowledge of this species and their ecosystems under natural conditions and develop proactive conservation strategies.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Schoettle, A. W.; Sniezko, R. A.; Kegley, A.; Danchok, R.; Burns, K. S. 2012. Patterns of resistance to Cronartium ribicola in Pinus aristata, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J. 2012. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. p. 336.

    Keywords

    Cronartium ribicola, Pinus aristata, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, white pine blister rust (WPBR)

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/43645