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    Author(s): Jeffrey S. Ward
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: MMiller, Gary W.; Schuler, Thomas M.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Brooks, John R.; Grushecky, Shawn T.; Spong, Ben D.; Rentch, James S., eds. Proceedings, 18th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2012 March 26-28; Morgantown, WV; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-117. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 93-104.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (219.44 KB)

    Description

    Eighty years of data on stand development on 39 strip transects were used to elucidate the influence of disturbance on forest composition. Transects were measured at 10-year intervals between 1927 and 2007, except for 1947, and the resulting data include records of 35,953 stems. Disturbances included a wildfire in 1932, single-year defoliations (1964, 1972, 1981), and multi-year defoliations (1961-1963, 1971-1972, 1981). Wildfire reduced basal area by 46 percent. During the first defoliation period, oak basal area mortality averaged 36 (multi-year) and 12 percent (single-year). In 2007, oak density (stems per acre) on burned transects in 2007 was twice that observed on unburned transects, 90 and 42; while maple density was higher on transects that had had only single-year defoliations (190) compared with multi-year defoliation (119). In contrast, birch density was lower on transects with single-year defoliations (97) compared to multi-year defoliation (198). Oak ingrowth was highest following wildfire, 244 stems per acre per decade (SA10) and was negligible during subsequent decades, 6 SA10. Transects with multi-year defoliations averaged 80 birch SA10 compared with 44 maple SA10 between 1967 and 1997. During that same period, maple ingrowth averaged 35 SA10 and birch ingrowth averaged 14 SA10 following single-year defoliations. Disturbance type has a long-term impact on forest composition.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Ward, Jeffrey S. 2013. Influence of disturbance on stand development during forest succession. In: Miller, Gary W.; Schuler, Thomas M.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Brooks, John R.; Grushecky, Shawn T.; Spong, Ben D.; Rentch, James S., eds. Proceedings, 18th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2012 March 26-28; Morgantown, WV; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-117. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 93-104.

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