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    Author(s): Nina Shishkoff
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 54
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
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    Description

    In this study, viburnum (Viburnum) cuttings were treated with oomatistats (Subdue Maxx®, Banol®, and Aliette®) at standard rates for use as soil drenches or with biological control organisms (Streptomyces lydicus formulated as Actinovate SP® and used as a soil drench, and Trichoderma asperellum formulated in wheat bran and used as a top dressing) 4 days after roots were infected with Phytophthora ramorum. The amount of inoculum in runoff samples taken weekly for 5 weeks was studied using a quantitative assay analyzed as a mixed model regression and the percent colonization of roots at the end of each experiment analyzed by a general linear model. Experiments were run three times for each compound or biological control agent, except for Trichoderma, which was run twice. Root-infected viburnum cuttings treated with Banol® did not show any reduction in inoculum production compared to non-treated cuttings, and there was no significant difference in root colonization at the end of the experiment. Aliette®-treated viburnum cuttings gave off significantly less inoculum than non-treated plants at all sampling dates (days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35; p < 0.02-0.0001), and root colonization was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Subdue Maxx® significantly reduced inoculum at all sampling dates (p < 0.02-0.0001) and reduced root colonization (p < 0.0001). When Actinovate SP®was applied as a soil drench to root-infected cuttings, significantly less inoculum was released than from non-treated ones at all sampling dates (p < 0.002-0.0001), and root colonization was reduced (p < 0.05). When T. asperellum in wheat bran was applied as a top dressing to pots containing root-infected cuttings, runoff contained significantly less inoculum than non-treated plants at all sampling dates (p < 0.0001), and root colonization was reduced (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that biological control agents are as effective as Subdue Maxx® and Aliette® at reducing inoculum production and root colonization in experiments lasting 35 days and are more effective than Banol®.

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    Citation

    Shishkoff, Nina. 2013. Effect of oomatistatic Compounds and biological control agents on prodcuction of inoculum and root colonization of plants infected with Phytophthora ramorum. In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 54.

    Keywords

    Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi

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