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    Author(s): Y. Valachovic; L. Quinn-Davidson; E. Goldsworthy; P. Cannon
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 99-107
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (0 B)

    Description

    In California, sudden oak death (SOD) treatment efforts have been localized, often targeting specific trees or properties. The widespread nature of SOD establishment and spread in coastal mountains of California has mostly precluded use of broader eradication strategies, which are more applicable in isolated infestations like those in Oregon. However, the 2010 detection of a new infestation in Redwood Valley, California—more than 80 km from the nearest known infestation, and the northernmost known occurrence in the state—presented an opportunity for the first attempt at containment and potential "eradication" in California. The infestation was isolated to a relatively small geographic area and was of high priority, effectively located at the gateway to Redwood National Park, Yurok and Hoopa tribal lands, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and US Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDA FS) lands, and the dense tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh) forests of the Klamath watershed.

    Given the nature of the Redwood Valley infestation and its proximity to important ecological and cultural landscapes, spread of the disease from this area is highly undesirable. However, the context for the management in this area was complex, requiring careful collaboration from the beginning. The pathogen was initially detected through stream sampling near Orick in May 2010, many miles downstream from Redwood Valley and near the mouth of the 80,937 ha (200,000 ac) Redwood Creek watershed. Only through extensive sampling and the targeted engagement of large landowners throughout the watershed was the source of the infestation narrowed to Redwood Valley. Even then, the infestation spanned a number of private properties, including small residential landholdings and large private timberlands, and necessitated the cooperation and commitment of diverse stakeholders. Likewise, the project required a prompt, creative funding strategy and ultimately involved the support of the USDA FS, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE), the University of California, local contractors, and private landowners. The multi-tiered collaboration required by this project is unique for SOD management efforts in California, where treatments have previously been limited in size and scope.

    As this disease advances, we must develop new management approaches while gleaning fresh insight from old strategies. The Redwood Valley project, which blends a unique social and geographic context with a treatment strategy not yet used in California, provides new tools and inspiration for disease response. It also highlights the increasing need for a comprehensive strategic response plan, one that could moderate the coordinating and funding challenges that were encountered in the Redwood Valley example and are likely to emerge in future cases.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Valachovic, Y.; Quinn-Davidson, L.; Goldsworthy, E.; Cannon, P. 2013. Novel approaches to SOD management in California wildlands: a case study of "eradication" and collaboration in Redwood Valley. In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 99-107.

    Keywords

    Phytophthora ramorum, sudden oak death, eradication, management, collaboration

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