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    Author(s): Clay M. DeLong; Kerri M. Frangioso; Margaret R. Metz; Ross K. Meentemeyer; Dave M. Rizzo
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 127-129
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
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    Description

    The Big Sur region of central California is a rugged, fire-prone area that has been severely affected by Phytophthora ramorum. Meentemeyer et al. (2008) estimated that over 200,000 oaks and tanoaks had been killed by P. ramorum across the Big Sur ecoregion by 2005. In June of 2008, a complex of lightning-initiated fires burned over 95,000 ha in Big Sur, including 43 percent of our long-term network of disease monitoring plots. Here we compile data collected in these plots before the fire in 2006 and 2007 (Metz et al. 2011), with 3 consecutive years of data following the fire (2009 through 2011).

    Metz et al. (2011) demonstrated that fire severity was greater in areas recently invaded by P. ramorum. We further demonstrate how fire and P. ramorum have interacted to affect tree mortality and regeneration, and document the first stages of forest succession. The asymmetric impacts of these two disturbances across species may create significant conservation and management challenges in years to come (Metz et al. 2011).

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    Citation

    DeLong, Clay M.; Frangioso, Kerri M.; Metz, Margaret R.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.; Rizzo, Dave M. 2013. Forest succession following wildfire and sudden oak death epidemic. In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 127-129.

    Keywords

    Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/44145