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    Author(s): E.K. Peterson; E.M. Hansen; W. Sutton; P.W. Reeser; J.M. Hulbert
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 154-157
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (0 B)

    Description

    Oregon's sudden oak death (SOD) eradication program has focused its efforts upon the aggressive treatment of tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook.& Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh) over all other host species in its efforts to control the spread of Phytophthora ramorum. Despite its known importance to the epidemiology of SOD as described in California, bay laurel (Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.) has been retained at some eradicated sites due to apparent lack of infection. Some of these trees have since been identified as harboring P. ramorum. Along with the retention of California bay laurel at some recently identified SOD sites, these circumstances have allowed us to compare rates of infection and sporulation of P. ramorum from tanoak and California bay laurel in Oregon. In this study, we compared incidence of P. ramorum infection between tanoak and California bay laurel located within one forest stand identified as positive for SOD in 2011; additionally, we compared rates of inoculum capture with open, baited buckets set underneath either host. While the collection of inoculum in baited buckets has proven to be a useful measure of detection during periods with rain, we also sought to assess the feasibility of monitoring sporulation and spore movement in precipitation resulting from fog.

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    Citation

    Peterson, E.K.; Hansen, E.M.; Sutton, W.; Reeser, P.W.; Hulbert, J.M. 2013. Comparison of the recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from tanoak and California bay laurel, and the potential recovery of inoculum in fog. In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 154-157.

    Keywords

    Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi

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